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How To Keep Your Easter Activities Safe

Food Safety

One of the main overlooked hazards of Easter is food safety. Dyes are not typically healthy for ingestion so hands should be washed thoroughly before and after dying, eggs should be refrigerated thoroughly before and after dying, and any egg that’s shell is cracked should not be ingested because the dye might penetrate the surface of the egg. Furthermore, candies that are put inside plastic Easter eggs should be considered for those who have food allergies. Candies that do not contain dairy, peanuts, or gluten are among the safest for sensitive children to eat

Choking Hazards

If you choose to use plastic eggs, you’ll want to be sure that the contents are not choking hazards. If your children are older than 5 years old than you probably won’t need to worry about this too much, but if you do have toddlers participating in an Easter egg hunt or are receiving an Easter basket of plastic eggs filled with prizes, the best fillers for them will be toy cars, hair accessories, cereal and animal crackers or foods that easily dissolve.

Game Alternatives

If you’re concerned about hosting an Easter egg hunt outdoors, here are some fun games to consider as alternatives where children can easily be supervised.

Guess How Many Jelly Beans

Fill a jar with jelly beans and decorate a box on the side where children can submit their name and number for guessing how many beans are in the jar. You should know how many beans are in the jar ahead of time to save yourself the headache and be able to announce the winner before your guests leave the party. The closest guess to the actual number of jelly beans can take home the jar or be given another pre-established prize

Easter Egg Spoon Race

One of the most fun ways to play a spoon race is on teams for team building skills, to provide you more winners and less hurt feelings, and provide a good variety of different kinds of games. Split the children into teams of 5-7 players and have them line up behind their team at a starting line you can create with spray paint (on grass) or tape (on floor). At (ready, set) “GO!”, the front runner will carry an egg on a spoon as fast as they are able 15-20 feet away to another line, and back. Here they will pass the spoon to their next teammate. The team whose members all complete the race first wins!