Posts

, ,

EPA Safety Approval Labels

E.P.A. stands for the Environmental Protection Agency. The E.PA. Is responsible for protecting the health of the environment and people in their homes, schools, and workplaces. To achieve this they develop and enforce federal regulations safely and fairly, give grants, carry out environmental and human health research, publish and curate information and educate the public, and seek out and maintain sponsorship (including with other countries).

The E.P.A. Is a government agency that does all this, but some responsibilities maybe shared or delegated to other government or local agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Energy Office Of Environmental Management. Nearly half the government budget dedicated to running the E.P.A., half is spent on awarding grants to State environmental programs, non-profit organizations, education institutions, etc. The majority of their missions are to conduct scientific research and organize community clean-up projects. These projects help the E.P.A make better decisions and implement better practices.

One division of the Environmental Protection Agency is dedicated to updating standards, conducting research, and enforcing safety regulations of consumer products. This division brings you an easy way to identify the safest chemical ingredient products “without sacrificing quality or performance”. Look for the “Safer Choice” label (previously known as the “Designed For The Environment” or DFE label) and know that you’ve got in your hands, one of the 2,000 safest products to use in your home, office, school, hotel, or sports venue.

The companies that sport the label have participated in the program voluntarily and put forth their own investment in research to meet the requirement to obtain the label. Every single ingredient that makes up the product, no matter the percentage, is reviewed by the E.P.A. The criteria for determining the safety to the environment and human exposure is carcinogenicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity, and toxicity to aquatic life, among other things. Products are also checked for pollution and respiratory threat, PH balance, and that they perform similarly to conventional products on the market. Together, the product creators and the E.P.A., make sure the label and design of the product also meets standards in conveying what it is and what it does.

For more information on this program and others like it, visit epa.gov.